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Idaho murders: Police shed light on sixth person listed on lease at Moscow home

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MOSCOW, Idaho – Idaho police say they do not believe the sixth roommate of the University of Idaho students slain earlier this month was involved in the quadruple homicide, which remains unsolved after 19 days.

The Moscow Police Department revealed Thursday that a sixth person was listed on the lease at 1122 King Road, which has been considered a crime scene since the November 13 bloodshed. Officials revealed hours later that the person had moved out prior to the before the school year began and was not present at the address at the time the four students were killed. 

The Friday afternoon press release further stated that detectives “do not believe this person has any involvement in the murders.” 

UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO STUDENTS KILLED: A TIMELINE OF EVENTS

Three of the building’s tenants, Xana Kernodle, 20, and 21-year-olds Kaylee Goncalves and Madison Mogen, were among those found killed just before noon on November 13, police said. Kernodle’s boyfriend, 20-year-old Ethan Chapin, also did not survive the attack.

Mogen and Goncalves were sleeping on the same floor, in the same bed, when they were stabbed multiple times, according to police and family members. Chapin and Kerndodle were on a different floor. 

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Police have said the victims were asleep around 3 a.m. and 4 a.m. when they were stabbed multiple times on the second and third floors of the three-story home. The medical examiner determined some of the victims had shown signs of fighting back. 

The residence was located just a block from the University of Idaho campus perimeter, and within eyeshot of some fraternity houses. 

MOSCOW, IDAHO, POLICE CHIEF DISMISSES QUADRUPLE MURDERS TURNING TO COLD CASE: ‘WE’RE GOING TO SOLVE THIS’

Two other roommates were on the bottom floor of the home at the time and survived. 

According to authorities, Moscow Police officers responded around 11:58 a.m. to a report of an “unconscious person” at the address, but several people had gathered at the crime scene by the time police arrived, officials said.

Ethan Chapin, 20, Xana Kernodle, 20, Madison Mogen, 21, and Kaylee Goncalves, 21, along with the women's two other roommates in Kaylee Goncalves' final Instagram post, shared the day before the slayings.

Ethan Chapin, 20, Xana Kernodle, 20, Madison Mogen, 21, and Kaylee Goncalves, 21, along with the women’s two other roommates in Kaylee Goncalves’ final Instagram post, shared the day before the slayings.
(@kayleegoncalves/Instagram)

According to police, the 911 call “originated from inside the residence,” and came from one of the surviving roommates’ cell phones. Police said multiple people spoke to the dispatcher before officers arrived.

Police have since towed five vehicles from the King Road home, and said they are in talks about when and how they will release the crime scene

Police have named the four victims of an apparent quadruple homicide at the University of Idaho as Madison Mogen, Ethan Chapin, Xana Kernodle and Kaylee GonCalves. 

Police have named the four victims of an apparent quadruple homicide at the University of Idaho as Madison Mogen, Ethan Chapin, Xana Kernodle and Kaylee GonCalves. 
(Moscow City Police Department/Instagram)

Officials have said they believe the attack was “targeted,” despite some confusion as to how or why, and have not identified the intended victim.   

On Wednesday, Idaho State Police Communications Director Aaron Snell said all of the vehicles that were towed from the home were previously searched and are “still part of the crime scene” and the ongoing search warrant. All five have been moved to the City of Moscow Maintenance Shop, where police can access them if the need arises. 

A Range Rover understood to have belonged to Kaylee Goncalves, and several other cars of unknown ownership, are towed away from the scene of the quadruple homicide where she was killed in Moscow, Idaho.

A Range Rover understood to have belonged to Kaylee Goncalves, and several other cars of unknown ownership, are towed away from the scene of the quadruple homicide where she was killed in Moscow, Idaho.
(Derek Shook for Fox News Digital)

Police have said they have collected 113 pieces of “physical evidence” and captured about 4,000 photos of the crime scene. Investigators have received more than 488 “digital media submissions” via the FBI portal. 

Investigators are still working to identify a suspect, and have not yet recovered the weapon. 

State police forensics look for clues in Moscow, Idaho on Monday, November 21, 2022. Four University of Idaho students who were slain on November 13 in this house.

State police forensics look for clues in Moscow, Idaho on Monday, November 21, 2022. Four University of Idaho students who were slain on November 13 in this house.
(Derek Shook for Fox News Digital)

The Moscow Police Department is urging the public to submit any images or information that they think could be important or useful to their investigation. They can do so by calling 208-883-7180, submitting tips through [email protected], and sending digital media here. 

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Authorities have also created a dedicated webpage related to the King Road attack.

Fox News’ Adam Sabes contributed to this report. 



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Former New Zealand rugby player Johnstone becomes first All Black to come out as gay

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Former New Zealand rugby player Johnstone becomes first All Black to come out as gay



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Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence awarded to Julie Otsuka, Ed Yong

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Novelist Julie Otsuka has strong memories of libraries from her childhood California — the bike rides with her best friend to the local branch; the soft, firm sound of librarians closing books; the shopping bags she and her friend would fill with science fiction and other stories.

“It seemed like I lived at the library,” she says. “I felt very free to explore there, and explore away from adult eyes.”

The library community also has warm feelings about Otsuka. Her novel “The Swimmers,” in which a group of swimmers collectively narrate their daily routines and what happens when those routines are disrupted, has won the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction, a $5,000 honor presented by the American Library Association. Ed Yong’s “An Immense World: How Animal Senses Reveal the Hidden Realms Around Us” won the nonfiction medal, which also comes with a $5,000 cash prize.

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“Julie Otsuka proves herself a master of narrative voice, thrillingly balancing the incredible vitality of community life with the myriad challenges faced by individuals and families within that community,” Stephen Sposato, chair of the medals’ selection committee, said in a statement released Sunday.

Japanese-born U.S. author Julie Otsuka, above, has been awarded the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction. Ed Yong won the same award for nonfiction. 

Japanese-born U.S. author Julie Otsuka, above, has been awarded the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction. Ed Yong won the same award for nonfiction. 
(MEHDI FEDOUACH/AFP via Getty Images)

“And, standing out even during a recent golden age of nature writing, Ed Yong dazzles with a deeply considered exploration of the many modes of sensory perception that life has evolved to navigate the world, written with exhilarating freshness.”

COLSON WHITEHEAD NOVEL A CARNEGIE MEDAL FINALIST

Otsuka, 60, has also written the novels “The Buddha in the Attic,” winner of the PEN/Faulkner award in 2011; and “When the Emperor Was Divine.” Her other honors include a Guggenheim Fellowship and an Arts and Letters Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

The 41-year-old Yong, a native of Malaysia who emigrated to the United Kingdom in his teens, is a staff writer for The Atlantic. He won a Pulitzer Prize in 2021 for his reporting on the coronavirus pandemic. Like Otsuka, Yong was influenced early by libraries. “Strangely enough for indoor spaces, libraries for me were gateways to the natural world,” he told The Associated Press. “As a kid, I spent a lot of time reading books that expanded my knowledge — and love — of nature, and I can only hope that ‘An Immense World’ does the same for people today.”

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The Carnegie Medals were established in 2012, with help from a grant from the Carnegie Corporation of New York. Previous winners include James McBride, Doris Kearns Goodwin and Matthew Desmond.



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Teacher accused of abuse at Edinburgh schools arrested

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Man accused of abuse by BBC broadcaster Nicky Campbell set to appear in court in South Africa.



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