Connect with us

Sports

Brooklyn Nets pass on Ime Udoka and name Jacque Vaughn head coach

Published

on


Jacque Vaughn is Nets’ interim head coach no more.

Jacque Vaughn is Nets’ interim head coach no more.
Image: Getty Images

Mere hours before a nationally televised matchup against the New York Knicks, the Brooklyn Nets opted for a semblance of stability, or at least a stable shoulder to lean on, when they removed the interim tag from assistant coach Jacque Vaughn’s title.

Whoever is interviewing for the Nets open P.R. coordinator position just released a sigh of relief that they won’t have to answer for the Ime Udoka hire that seemed imminent a week ago.

The moxie it would have taken to stroll Ime Udoka through the doors to face the ravenous New York media and expect the focus to be on basketball would have required some Simone Biles-grade gymnastics. Udoka’s negotiations with the Nets may have reached an impasse when cooler heads began convincing owner Joseph Tsai to avoid the artificial drama and just stick with Vaughn.

Promoting Udoka in 2020 or early 2021, when he was on the Nets staff, would have been a good look. Hiring a controversy magnet who was Eric Benet-ing his way out of the Celtics job merely two months after he was suspended for the season by Boston’s Human Resources Department was terrible optics.

In 2022, Udoka was too much for this team to shoulder. Every press conference in the first few weeks would be a game of 21 questions about his improper relationship with a Celtics staff member. In Vaughn, the Nets have a head coach who, like Udoka, worked his way from NBA journeyman to assistant. If anything, Vaughn’s hiring earns them the positive press they badly need. Not only did the franchise fire the NBA’s last white North American superstar in Steve Nash, to consider replacing him with a Black coach engulfed in scandal, but they thought better of it, and promoted a deserving, scandal-free minority coach.

And Vaughn knows a little something about rebounding from rough starts. In 2001, he started the regular season missing an NBA record 22 consecutive shots and had the TNT crew of Charles Barkley, Ernie Johnson, and Kenny Smith praying for his shot to finally fall. He wound up shooting a career-high 47 percent from the field that season.

Vaughn will need that sort of resilience to steer Brooklyn back from the jagged rocks they’ve been speeding toward during their 2-5 start. His course correction has been a short-term success, and the Nets’ downward spiral has seemingly slowed since his promotion. Which is all the more reason to keep those good vibes going.

Vaughn’s ability to navigate through failure is emblematic of why superstars rarely make good coaches. As an active player, Vaughn was a no-frills, heady backup point guard. He’ll need that background and his familiarity in the locker room as a Nets assistant since 2016 to connect with Kyrie Irving in ways that Steve Nash never could. Despite Nash being the coach that Durant signed off on after getting to know him while Nash was the Warriors’ player development consultant, he then turned him into a scapegoat over the summer.

Ultimately, Irving’s insubordination was the last straw. According to what an anonymous advance scout said he witnessed during Nash’s final loss, a contest against the Indiana Pacers on Oct. 29, Irving ignored Nash’s play calls nearly a dozen times. Coupled with reports that Irving would run practices after Nash left the facility last season, it’s obvious that Vaughn’s prior experience amid NBA struggles will be sorely needed. On a superstar-laden roster, Vaughn is the scrappy professional who has crawled through the muck just to get this opportunity.

Like Udoka, Vaughn can also claim an advanced coaching degree from the School of Gregg Popovich after spending two seasons on the Spurs staff before accepting the Orlando Magic’s head coaching job. His first NBA head coaching opportunity was a death trap. After three seasons, he was relieved of his duties, but nobody has won in Orlando since.

The Nets needed a serious coach who can moonlight as their sherpa through tempestuous weather instead of anchoring them in the eye of a hurricane and they got one in Vaughn.



Source link

Sports

Arsenal FC XI vs Lyon: Predicted lineup, confirmed team news and injury latest for Dubai Super Cup friendly

Published

on



M

ikel Arteta will mix youth with experience when selecting his Arsenal team to face Lyon in the Dubai Super Cup.

A handful of players remain unavailable while continuing on their path to World Cup glory in Qatar, such as Bukayo Saka and Gabriel Martinelli.

Furthermore, those knocked out of the tournament will not feature with Takehiro Tomiyasu in particular asking for a break from football following Japan’s heartbreak against Croatia in the last-16.

Granit Xhaka flew straight from Qatar to Arsenal’s camp acoss the desert but is highly unlikely to feaure against Lyon.

Arsenal await their return with a mid-season trip to Dubai for a warm-weather training camp and this, the first of three friendlies.

Already, the Gunners have played a behind-closed-doors match with Watford that could shed some light on Arteta’s approach to this week’s games.

Martin Odegaard, Gabriel Magalhaes and Eddie Nketiah all started the 4-2 defeat before a team of academy players entered the fray after the break.

This included Nathan Butler-Oyedeji, Ethan Nwaneri and Lino Sousa. Given the youngsters conceded three goals without reply against Watford, they are likely to again have to settle for substitute appearances in the Lyon friendly.

Predicted Arsenal XI: Hein; Cedric, Holding, Gabriel, Tierney; Elneny, Lokonga, Odegaard; Nelson, Nketiah, Marquinhos.



Source link

Continue Reading

Sports

Hansi Flick to remain Germany manager despite World Cup group-stage exit | Football News

Published

on



Hansi Flick will remain as Germany coach despite the four-time World Cup winners exiting this year’s tournament in the group stages.

He will remain in charge of the country until at least Euro 2024, at the end of his existing contract.

Flick only took charge of the national team last year, on the back of leading Bayern Munich to the Champions League and two Bundesliga titles in as many years.

He succeeded Joachim Low, who led Germany to the World Cup in 2014, before a shock group-stage exit in 2018 and a last-16 defeat by England at Euro 2020 last year.

Under Flick, they were unable to reach the knockouts for a second straight World Cup thanks in large part to a 2-1 defeat by Japan, with a draw against Spain and victory over Costa Rica insufficient to send them through.

Speaking after that surprise elimination, Flick said: “If you know me and my team, I know we can get up quickly and recover from that. Now we need to assess our work during the World Cup and head in a different direction. This is the next step we are going to undertake and we will do that very soon.

“For the future of German football, we need to train differently. We will work on a future that is very important and very decisive, and we will see how we can implement our idea.

“For years we’ve been talking about new goalkeepers and wingbacks, but what was always good was that we defended well. We need the basics to be right.”



Source link

Continue Reading

Sports

The ManningCast revolution should not have been televised

Published

on


Peyton and Eli Manning

Peyton and Eli Manning
Photo: Getty Images

It would be interesting to see how much ESPN was responsible for of the $1.5 billion that Disney lost last quarter in the streaming section. What section of the Mothership do the contracts for Joe Buck, Troy Aikman, and the Mannings fall under? After a year-plus, the nuance of the ManningCast has worn off. It Isn’t leading podcasts, and it’s easier to skip the second screen and just watch the easily digestible clips that ESPN uploads on the app while the game is going.

For whatever reason, Monday Night Football is just another primetime game, and it doesn’t have the luxury of being able to flex out games like Steelers-Colts or even the Bucs-Saints contest that was unwatchable for three-plus quarters. There’s an argument, and a pretty compelling one, that Buck and Aikman’s Fox Game of the Week slot was better than ESPN’s Monday showcase. There’s no doubt Sunday Night Football is preferable due to the pliability of the schedule.

I don’t care how charming Peyton and Eli are, if the teams on the field don’t matter, the audience will find something else to do on the trillions of streaming options. The ManningCast spinoffs suffer for the same reason that no NBA studio show can replicate Inside the NBA. Charles Barkley’s charisma cannot be duplicated just like the chemistry and repartee between two Super Bowl-winning brothers can’t be recreated.

Alex Rodriguez and Michael Kay calling a game is an actual nightmare of Red Sox fans and the hoards of people who hate the Yankees and/or A-Rod, of which there are many. Pat McAfee used his connections with Peyton and Omaha Productions to develop a simulcast for college football, which is never going to work no matter how much he grows on you.

Baseball, basketball, and even college football don’t have a weekly monopoly of viewers. There’s always another game to flip to in the NBA and MLB, so the alternative to a shitty national broadcast game is a different matchup. The Association slashed their League Pass prices this year, and it’s never been easier to find illegal streams.

Primetime NFL games are routinely atop the ratings because they have the night to themselves, and half the reason viewers switch to ESPN 2 is because the game is an abomination. When a hyped Saturday showcase fizzles out, there are a million other options to watch, and none of them are McAfee screaming through a blowout. I can’t imagine that it’s worthy of a four-hour chunk of ESPN 2’s college football Saturday.

The ManningCast ratings are whatever and have plateaued during the second season. But, yes, let’s dedicate a production team and everything else that goes into it for a little over a million viewers on a channel that’s in direct competition with the one we want everybody watching.

I don’t see how a ManningCast on Sunday night would benefit NBC because they shut down their nationally dedicated sports network, and it would run on USA or Peacock. I guess Amazon could try something on Thursdays, but they have an even shittier schedule, and people have a hard enough time remembering the game is on Prime — or that it’s even on at all.

The worst attempts are cheap knockoffs, with outlets throwing talking heads in front of a camera and having them regurgitate the same takes they’ve been spewing all week. Fucking hell, I can’t watch the pregame as it is, and now I’m supposed to spend an extra three hours with some I can’t stand for a half hour? Absolutely not.

It’s really hard to be engaging for long stretches on a PG-13 restriction. That’s why I wait for the perfectly cut clips of Peyton and Eli. The show doesn’t work for a full four wuarters, and a bad game bogs down the show like a bad host makes for a clunky SNL. The Manning bros are more or less live-streaming a football game interspersed with big-name guests that normal sportscasters can’t book.

It’s successful because of the two hosts. You know what I’d also watch those two lovable idiots do? Play charades like in the Caesars commercial. The way Eli delivers, “It’s 27 words” is hilarious, and Peyton telling his teammate to “Stop guessing helmet catch” is incredible. Who knows if they’d work in a studio setting just because most of what they do best is a product of filling time. The lasting moments from Inside the NBA come when Chuck, Shaq, and Kenny go off the rails after a long night in Studio J.

Now that we’ve arrived at the juncture where I’m repeating previously stated points, I’ll finish with this. The ManningCast didn’t revolutionize sports programming. Certain athletes are better at broadcasting than others, and they’re afforded a format that’s not replicable in any other sport, not even its amateur version. They’ve been remarkable in an opportunity that’s possible for 0.000000001 percent of sportscasters.

Kudos. Congrats. It worked for a company that lost a billion five in a quarter and hasn’t been able to duplicate it. You want to revolutionize sports media? Create whatever comes after Twitter.



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending