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US Open: Andy Murray goes down in four sets to Matteo Berrettini at Flushing Meadows in New York | Tennis News

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Andy Murray suffered more Grand Slam agony with a frustrating four-set defeat to Matteo Berrettini in the third round of the US Open on Friday, while young Jack Draper retired injured during the third set of his clash with Karen Khachanov.

Murray was trying to reach the last 16 at a Grand Slam for the first time since his hip problems began in 2017 but, after threatening another vintage comeback, he fell to a 6-4 6-4 6-7 (1-7) 6-3 defeat in Arthur Ashe Stadium.

The Scot is at least edging back up the rankings and should hit his highest mark since May 2018 at around 43, but his ambitions remain much bigger than that and this is another season where he has been unable to make a mark at the majors.

The Scot said: “It’s really difficult. I’m surprised I’m still able to compete with guys that are right up at the top of the game.

“Matches like this, I’m really proud that I have worked myself into a position where I’m able to do that. I’m really disappointed that I didn’t get over the line today.

“But I get reminded, ‘this is the first time you’ve made the third round here since 2016’. It’s been a difficult six years for me. It’s been really hard.

“Although I’ve only made the third round here, I’m really proud of that effort that I put in to get myself back into these positions. I’m hoping that in the future I can go further but, considering, I did all right.”

Murray vs Berrettini: Match Stats

Murray Match Stats Berrettini
4 Aces 18
5 Double Faults 1
68% 1st serve win percentage 74%
54% 2nd serve win percentage 51%
2/4 Break points won 5/15
24 Total winners 55
43 Unforced errors 51
118 Total points won 135

Lots of people told me I wouldn’t be able to play again, and lots of people told me I’d be able to hit tennis balls but not compete professionally again. That was nonsense, and I want to see how close I can get back to the top of the game.

Andy Murray

Murray had talked positively about his fitness and movement after dropping just one set in his first two matches to make it through to the third round in New York for the first time since 2016.

This was a real step up, though. Berrettini has had injury and illness problems himself this year but is a proven performer at the Grand Slams in particular.

He has made at least the quarter-finals at the last four major tournaments he has played, although he missed the French Open this year following hand surgery and then Wimbledon, where he reached the final last summer, after an ill-timed bout of Covid-19.

There was little to choose between the pair in the opening set but a double fault from Murray on break point in the seventh game proved the decisive moment.

The Scot then recovered from an early break down in the second and appeared to be gaining ascendancy from the baseline only to again be broken on a double fault, this time at 4-4.

Andy Murray of Great Britain communicate with his team during his match against Emilio Nava of the United States in the second round of the men's singles in the US Open at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center on August 31, 2022 in New York City. (Photo by Frey/TPN/Getty Images)
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Murray dug in admirably but was ultimately left frustrated

Murray threw his racket towards his chair in disgust as he found himself staring at a two-set deficit.

The 35-year-old has not fought back from two sets down to win a match since a clash with Yoshihito Nishioka here two years ago, which he admitted this week took him months to recover from.

He dug in admirably at the start of the third, saving five break points in his first three service games, and a pumped up Murray yelled in delight when he withstood more pressure to hold for 6-5.

He got his reward for that tenacity in the tie-break, with Berrettini choosing a bad moment to play his worst tennis of the match, losing seven points in a row.

The comeback really appeared to be on when Murray broke the powerful Berrettini serve in the opening game of the fourth set but the Italian hit back straight away and another lapse from his opponent at 3-4 was the final nail.

Murray said: “I served pretty poorly for a large part of the match, which hurt me a lot. I just couldn’t find any rhythm on serve.

“I hung in really well in the third set and you could see from the stats that, when I was getting into rallies, I was getting comfortably the better of those exchanges when I got past the first few shots.

“He served extremely well, got loads of free points on his serve. I didn’t. That was the difference.”

Murray will head home before turning his attention to Britain’s attempt to qualify for the Davis Cup quarter-finals in Glasgow later this month and then the Laver Cup at London’s O2.

He remains positive, saying: “I’m improving this year. I want to push and see how far I can go.

“That will be motivational for me and interesting to see, because lots of people told me I wouldn’t be able to play again, and lots of people told me I’d be able to hit tennis balls but not compete professionally again. That was nonsense, and I want to see how close I can get back to the top of the game.

“We’ve got a couple of fun team events to look forward to now in the next few weeks, which can help after a loss like today, being around friends and the team environment, so I look forward to that. And then hopefully I continue to play better through to the end of the season.”

Draper retires injured during clash with Khachanov

Jack Draper of Great Britain looks on against Karen Khachanov during their Men's Singles Third Round match on Day Five of the 2022 US Open at USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center on September 02, 2022 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City. (Photo by Sarah Stier/Getty Images)
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Jack Draper was forced to retire injured against Karen Khachanov

Britain’s Draper saw his fine run at Flushing Meadows end in disappointment when he retired injured during the third set of his third-round encounter with Karen Khachanov.

The 20-year-old pulled off the biggest victory of his career in the second round, beating sixth seed Felix Auger-Aliassime, and was well placed against Russian 27th seed Khachanov after recovering from a slow start.

But Draper began to show discomfort early in the third set and, after dropping serve in the 11th game and consulting with the trainer, he called it a day, trailing 6-3 4-6 6-5.

He said: “It was just the top of my hamstring, the insertion between the hamstring and the groin. I’ve had problems with it before, and maybe this time it was just a lot of tennis I’ve played in the last seven weeks just caught up a little bit on me.

“I think I did it 2-0 in the third. I went out to a wide ball and I just felt a twinge. I feel like, when you strain something and it’s getting worse, there is just no going back from that, really.

“Especially at this level, you can’t compete if you’re injured. It was a tough one.”

Draper was not too downhearted, though, saying: “I think there is a lot of positives I can take from the match but I think the main thing is that I still need to improve my body. My body is just not ready to go really deep in this tournament.

“This is my second Slam on merit. It’s very different playing the five-set matches. I’ve beaten a couple of really good players, and I felt like today I was coming back. I would have had a chance to win that match if I was injury free.

“I can be very positive about the year I’ve had so far as well. When I look back, I was thinking about stopping tennis during Covid. So, to think I’m here now and I’ve broken the top 50 this week, I’m very proud of myself.”

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Arsenal FC XI vs Lyon: Predicted lineup, confirmed team news and injury latest for Dubai Super Cup friendly

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M

ikel Arteta will mix youth with experience when selecting his Arsenal team to face Lyon in the Dubai Super Cup.

A handful of players remain unavailable while continuing on their path to World Cup glory in Qatar, such as Bukayo Saka and Gabriel Martinelli.

Furthermore, those knocked out of the tournament will not feature with Takehiro Tomiyasu in particular asking for a break from football following Japan’s heartbreak against Croatia in the last-16.

Granit Xhaka flew straight from Qatar to Arsenal’s camp acoss the desert but is highly unlikely to feaure against Lyon.

Arsenal await their return with a mid-season trip to Dubai for a warm-weather training camp and this, the first of three friendlies.

Already, the Gunners have played a behind-closed-doors match with Watford that could shed some light on Arteta’s approach to this week’s games.

Martin Odegaard, Gabriel Magalhaes and Eddie Nketiah all started the 4-2 defeat before a team of academy players entered the fray after the break.

This included Nathan Butler-Oyedeji, Ethan Nwaneri and Lino Sousa. Given the youngsters conceded three goals without reply against Watford, they are likely to again have to settle for substitute appearances in the Lyon friendly.

Predicted Arsenal XI: Hein; Cedric, Holding, Gabriel, Tierney; Elneny, Lokonga, Odegaard; Nelson, Nketiah, Marquinhos.



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Hansi Flick to remain Germany manager despite World Cup group-stage exit | Football News

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Hansi Flick will remain as Germany coach despite the four-time World Cup winners exiting this year’s tournament in the group stages.

He will remain in charge of the country until at least Euro 2024, at the end of his existing contract.

Flick only took charge of the national team last year, on the back of leading Bayern Munich to the Champions League and two Bundesliga titles in as many years.

He succeeded Joachim Low, who led Germany to the World Cup in 2014, before a shock group-stage exit in 2018 and a last-16 defeat by England at Euro 2020 last year.

Under Flick, they were unable to reach the knockouts for a second straight World Cup thanks in large part to a 2-1 defeat by Japan, with a draw against Spain and victory over Costa Rica insufficient to send them through.

Speaking after that surprise elimination, Flick said: “If you know me and my team, I know we can get up quickly and recover from that. Now we need to assess our work during the World Cup and head in a different direction. This is the next step we are going to undertake and we will do that very soon.

“For the future of German football, we need to train differently. We will work on a future that is very important and very decisive, and we will see how we can implement our idea.

“For years we’ve been talking about new goalkeepers and wingbacks, but what was always good was that we defended well. We need the basics to be right.”



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The ManningCast revolution should not have been televised

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Peyton and Eli Manning

Peyton and Eli Manning
Photo: Getty Images

It would be interesting to see how much ESPN was responsible for of the $1.5 billion that Disney lost last quarter in the streaming section. What section of the Mothership do the contracts for Joe Buck, Troy Aikman, and the Mannings fall under? After a year-plus, the nuance of the ManningCast has worn off. It Isn’t leading podcasts, and it’s easier to skip the second screen and just watch the easily digestible clips that ESPN uploads on the app while the game is going.

For whatever reason, Monday Night Football is just another primetime game, and it doesn’t have the luxury of being able to flex out games like Steelers-Colts or even the Bucs-Saints contest that was unwatchable for three-plus quarters. There’s an argument, and a pretty compelling one, that Buck and Aikman’s Fox Game of the Week slot was better than ESPN’s Monday showcase. There’s no doubt Sunday Night Football is preferable due to the pliability of the schedule.

I don’t care how charming Peyton and Eli are, if the teams on the field don’t matter, the audience will find something else to do on the trillions of streaming options. The ManningCast spinoffs suffer for the same reason that no NBA studio show can replicate Inside the NBA. Charles Barkley’s charisma cannot be duplicated just like the chemistry and repartee between two Super Bowl-winning brothers can’t be recreated.

Alex Rodriguez and Michael Kay calling a game is an actual nightmare of Red Sox fans and the hoards of people who hate the Yankees and/or A-Rod, of which there are many. Pat McAfee used his connections with Peyton and Omaha Productions to develop a simulcast for college football, which is never going to work no matter how much he grows on you.

Baseball, basketball, and even college football don’t have a weekly monopoly of viewers. There’s always another game to flip to in the NBA and MLB, so the alternative to a shitty national broadcast game is a different matchup. The Association slashed their League Pass prices this year, and it’s never been easier to find illegal streams.

Primetime NFL games are routinely atop the ratings because they have the night to themselves, and half the reason viewers switch to ESPN 2 is because the game is an abomination. When a hyped Saturday showcase fizzles out, there are a million other options to watch, and none of them are McAfee screaming through a blowout. I can’t imagine that it’s worthy of a four-hour chunk of ESPN 2’s college football Saturday.

The ManningCast ratings are whatever and have plateaued during the second season. But, yes, let’s dedicate a production team and everything else that goes into it for a little over a million viewers on a channel that’s in direct competition with the one we want everybody watching.

I don’t see how a ManningCast on Sunday night would benefit NBC because they shut down their nationally dedicated sports network, and it would run on USA or Peacock. I guess Amazon could try something on Thursdays, but they have an even shittier schedule, and people have a hard enough time remembering the game is on Prime — or that it’s even on at all.

The worst attempts are cheap knockoffs, with outlets throwing talking heads in front of a camera and having them regurgitate the same takes they’ve been spewing all week. Fucking hell, I can’t watch the pregame as it is, and now I’m supposed to spend an extra three hours with some I can’t stand for a half hour? Absolutely not.

It’s really hard to be engaging for long stretches on a PG-13 restriction. That’s why I wait for the perfectly cut clips of Peyton and Eli. The show doesn’t work for a full four wuarters, and a bad game bogs down the show like a bad host makes for a clunky SNL. The Manning bros are more or less live-streaming a football game interspersed with big-name guests that normal sportscasters can’t book.

It’s successful because of the two hosts. You know what I’d also watch those two lovable idiots do? Play charades like in the Caesars commercial. The way Eli delivers, “It’s 27 words” is hilarious, and Peyton telling his teammate to “Stop guessing helmet catch” is incredible. Who knows if they’d work in a studio setting just because most of what they do best is a product of filling time. The lasting moments from Inside the NBA come when Chuck, Shaq, and Kenny go off the rails after a long night in Studio J.

Now that we’ve arrived at the juncture where I’m repeating previously stated points, I’ll finish with this. The ManningCast didn’t revolutionize sports programming. Certain athletes are better at broadcasting than others, and they’re afforded a format that’s not replicable in any other sport, not even its amateur version. They’ve been remarkable in an opportunity that’s possible for 0.000000001 percent of sportscasters.

Kudos. Congrats. It worked for a company that lost a billion five in a quarter and hasn’t been able to duplicate it. You want to revolutionize sports media? Create whatever comes after Twitter.



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